Wednesday, 7 December 2011

Waaa tala cakap maa ITU SULAT KABA yang kata!

Salam bro..
Mr Kekurakukaku said..

Berikut yang ua jumpa dalam paper.. hahah
Gua jumpa k bkan gua yang kata

We’re born to be bitchy... and here’s scientific proof

By Claudia Connell

Last updated at 6:03 PM on 1st December 2011

My mornings usually kick off in much the same way — with me turning on the BBC Breakfast news, casting my eye over presenter Sian Williams and muttering under my breath ‘bit old for that outfit, aren’t you, sweetheart?’
Then I’ll probably flick over to Daybreak (well, somebody’s got to) and observe that if host Christine Bleakley’s shirts get much tighter, her breasts will start coming out of her back.
You see, some people need their morning fix of caffeine before they can function, others have to take a cold shower. Me? I need a ten-minute bitch-fest before I am ready to face the world.
A study found nearly all women feel threatened by an attractive peer, and as a result their reaction towards any woman they consider a threat can range from a simple sneer and eyebrow raise through to name calling
A study found nearly all women feel threatened by an attractive peer, and as a result their reaction towards any woman they consider a threat can range from a simple sneer and eyebrow raise through to name calling
Of course, neither Ms Williams or Ms Bleakley gives two hoots what I think of them — why would they? They are far slimmer, richer and more successful and attractive than I’ll ever be. They’ve heard it all before.
But my sniping isn’t just reserved for celebrities. Oh no. I’m an equal opportunities bitch.


This is why, during my train ride to work, I’ll invariably pick holes in fellow female passengers. My eye could be drawn to one I deem to be wearing too much make-up. ‘She looks like Ronald McDonald,’ I’ll laugh to myself. Then again, I could just as easily settle on somebody who’s not got any warpaint. ‘She thinks she’s a natural beauty, the poor delusional fool’.
Why such spitefulness?
Previously I just assumed that I was a bitter old boot. But it turns out I’m just doing what I am genetically pre-programmed to do — bitch about my fellow sex. A new academic study has found nearly all women feel threatened by an attractive peer, and as a result their reaction towards any woman they consider a threat can range from a simple sneer and eyebrow raise through to name calling.
A woman is judged on her looks in a way that a man never will be. Therefore she has to utilise her beauty in a way that a man can never understand...
Psychologist Tracy Vaillancourt, from the University of Ottawa and Dr Aanchal Sharma of McMaster University in Canada, both conducted studies with the intention of discovering just how hostile a woman will become when confronted by an attractive member of her own sex.
First, Dr Sharma assembled a group of women in a room. Half were friends, half strangers. They knew they were there to take part in a scientific study, but not what it entailed. All were being secretly filmed. As they waited, an attractive blonde woman dressed in a short skirt, a cleavage-flashing top, and knee-length boots came in and asked the group what study they were there to take part in.  
Later, she sent the same woman into the group, but this time she was unrecognisable as her hair was scraped back and she was wearing khaki trousers, flat shoes and a high-neck T-shirt.  The different reactions the woman received were staggering.  
When dressed sexily, she was greeted with eye-rolling and head-shaking as the women in the room traded sneers. And it wasn’t just the friends who exchanged tuts. Strangers also ganged up on her. After the sexy woman left, some of them burst out laughing and made comments. One even suggested it was obviously her intention to sleep with the professor. Yet, when the same woman entered the room plainly-dressed, her appearance drew no reaction.
In a second experiment, Dr Vaillancourt showed a group of women three photos of a slim,  pretty woman. In the first she was sexily dressed, in the second she was provocatively attired but her image had been digitally altered to a size 16. In the final snap, she was dressed in a conservative way.
The women were asked which girl they were more likely to be friends with and which they would introduce to their other half. Well, knock me down with a feather, if they didn’t all opt for the plain Jane. I doubt any woman, who is being truly honest, will be at all surprised by these findings.
A woman is judged on her looks in a way that a man never will be. Therefore she has to utilise her beauty (or find a savvy way to make up for the lack of it ) in a way that a man can never understand. An attractive woman will not only attract a better mate, but studies have found that she’ll earn more and live longer, too.
And it doesn’t just affect us in our adult lives. From that moment in school when you first click that pretty Suzie gets more attention, not only from the boys, but from the teacher, too, through to work situations where the office dolly bird gets away with murder while you’re reprimanded for simple errors, the message is clear — pretty girls lead a charmed life.
It’s no wonder the unchosen among us feel a little resentful. Just look at TV’s The Apprentice and the X Factor for evidence of how the female contestants will attempt to see off a rival. The girls on The X Factor have been accused of displaying bullying behaviour towards one another, while on The Apprentice, female contestants often let things become personal in the boardroom.
Dr Vaillancourt believes we are simply following our primeval instinct and attempting to survive by destroying the competition. Many years ago, we may have done it by clobbering somebody over the head with a club, now we do it with a withering look.  So that explains why, when I read a report that says I’m a Celebrity’s Sinitta was 43, my first reaction was ‘some bits of her might be’. But I’m not being a jealous bitch. I’m fulfilling my genetic destiny.

hahaha

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